Diaspora

Venezuela Parole Program to Include Cuba, Haiti, and Nicaragua – The National Law Review

The Biden administration has announced the expansion of its Venezuela Parole program to three additional countries – Cuba, Haiti, and Nicaragua. On Jan. 5, 2023, the Department of Homeland Security announced an expansion of its new migration process for Venezuelan nationals. The expansion allows those nationals from Cuba, Haiti, and Nicaragua and their immediate family members to request advance authorization for travel and temporary parole for up to two years in the United States, including work authorization. There will be a 30,000 per month cap on the number of parolees from all four countries.
Parolees must have a supporter in the United States who will provide financial and other support, among other requirements. In order to be eligible for advance travel to the United States to request parole at the border, a person must: 
Be a national of one of the four countries or be an immediate family member (spouse, common-law partner, or unmarried child under the age of 21) of an eligible applicant and traveling with them;
Possess a passport valid for international travel;
Be outside the United States;
Have a U.S.-based supporter who filed a Form I-134 on their behalf that USCIS has vetted and confirmed;
Provide for their own commercial travel to a U.S. airport and final U.S. destination;
Undergo and clear required screening and vetting;
Not be a permanent resident or dual national of any country other than one of these four countries, and not currently hold refugee status in any country;
This requirement does not apply to immediate family members (spouse, common-law partner, or unmarried child under the age of 21) of an eligible national of Venezuela with whom are traveling.
Not be an unaccompanied child;
Children under the age of 18 must be traveling to the United States in the care and custody of their parent or legal guardian.
Not have been ordered removed from the United States within the past five years or be subject to a bar based on a prior removal order;
Not have crossed irregularly into the United States, between ports of entry, after Oct. 19, 2022;
Not have unlawfully crossed the Mexican or Panamanian borders after Oct. 19, 2022; and
Comply with all additional requirements, including vaccination requirements and other public health guidelines.
When the national arrives at the United States port of entry, there will be additional screening and vetting. If granted parole, it will typically be for two years. Once granted parole, nationals may apply for employment authorization and request a social security number. 
About this Author
Laura Foote Reiff Co-Chairs the Business Immigration & Compliance Practice and is the Co-Managing Shareholder of the Northern Virginia Office. She also Co-Chairs the firm’s Labor & Employment Practice’s International Employment, Immigration & Workforce Strategies group. Laura focuses her practice on business immigration laws and regulations affecting U.S. and foreign companies, as well as related employment compliance and legislative issues.
Laura advises corporations on a variety of compliance-related issues, particularly related to…
 
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