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Scoop: Trump's new social network quietly courting influencers – Axios

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Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios
Former President Trump’s elusive new social media network Truth Social — which plans to go public — is reaching out to internet influencers asking them to “reserve their spots” for when it launches in February or March.
Why it matters: The outreach doesn’t mention Trump’s name or affiliation. Some influencers suggest that could be a ploy to enlist their support without realizing the affiliation.
Details: In an email to influencers obtained by Axios, a representative on behalf of Truth Social’s VIP department named “Ana” asks if those influencers would like to “reserve” their “preferred username for when we launch in late February/early March.”
The intrigue: Some of the the influencers that have been solicited are Democrats and publicly posted anti-Trump content.
The big picture: Truth Social has been the subject of a lot of intrigue, in part because the company has offered few details about who's building it.
Between the lines: While Truth Social has yet to reveal many details about its inner workings, there‘s some evidence the platform has been working to get up and running in the months ahead.
What to watch: Truth Social will enter a crowded field.
Judge Kentaji Brown Jackson (left) and Justice Leondra Kruger (right) Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images and Lonnie Tague, US Department of Justice
Two highly accomplished Black female judges — Ketanji Brown Jackson, a judge on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals; and Leondra Kruger, a justice on the California Supreme Court — are seen as the early front-runners to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.
The big picture: Jackson is a powerful federal judge with a record that progressives feel they can trust. Kruger was a highly regarded litigator and has carved out a reputation for working well with conservative judges.
The Federal Reserve's headquarters building. Photo: Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images
The Federal Reserve is on track to raise its main target interest rate in mid-March, as Chair Jerome Powell pledged to be "humble and nimble" in adapting policy to a fast-changing economy.
Why it matters: Fed leaders are looking to choke off inflation by raising interest rates in the near future, but keeping its options open for how fast and far the effort will go.
It takes a U.S. president an average of 70 days from the date a Supreme Court seat is vacated to nominate a replacement, according to data from the Supreme Court Historical Society.
Why it matters: With news outlets reporting liberal Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer's plans to retire, Democrats will be looking to confirm President Biden's nominee with enough time to refocus the national political debate ahead of the midterms.

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