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Deeply Concerned by Ongoing Humanitarian Cost of Global Food Insecurity, Speakers in Fifth Committee Back Proposed Funds to Maintain Food, Fertilizer Trade Deals – World – ReliefWeb

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SEVENTY-SEVENTH SESSION, 20TH MEETING (AM)
GA/AB/4408
Troubled by the ongoing humanitarian cost of global food insecurity, delegates in the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) today considered the Secretary-General’s proposal to support two initiatives — meant to keep food and fertilizers flowing to developing countries in 2023 — with a $10.9 million injection of funding.
Speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, Pakistan’s representative said the Group is deeply concerned as the sudden spike in global food supplies and essential fertilizers places the food security of many vulnerable countries at risk. Noting that the requested funding includes $2.3 million to support the Trade Facilitation Initiative and $7.89 million for the Black Sea Grain Initiative, he said the Group expects all delegates to build on the work completed successfully in October as they consider developing countries’ urgent needs and provide support for the required 2023 resources, he stressed.
In October, the Fifth Committee sent the Assembly a resolution to deliver $3.5 million in spending this year on the two initiatives formed in July. The Trade Facilitation Initiative enables unimpeded access of Russian food products and fertilizers to the world market; the Initiative on the Safe Transportation of Grain and Foodstuffs from Ukrainian Ports, signed in Istanbul and known as the Black Sea Grain Initiative, was set up for the safe navigation of exports of grains, related foodstuffs and fertilizers from Ukraine.
Noting the successful extension of the Istanbul agreement for four more months and the export of over 13 million tons of grain so far, the delegate of Türkiye emphasized that this accord is a two‑way street and the Russian Federation’s grain and fertilizers should not be blocked. As grain exports from Ukraine and the Russian Federation are crucial for global food security, Türkiye’s Government is investigating ways to boost the volume of the next harvest’s exported grain, he said, commending the valuable work of the Joint Coordination Centre and its personnel in monitoring the operation and expressing full support to the Secretary-General’s request.
The speaker for the Russian Federation, reaffirmed the Black Sea Grain Initiative’s significant contribution in stabilizing food markets and repeated his delegation’s request to the Secretariat for updated, detailed information about the number of developing countries, especially least developed, low-income and food-deficit countries, that are receiving supplies through the accord.
Chandramouli Ramanathan, Controller and Assistant Secretary-General of Programme Planning, Finance and Budget in the Department of Management Strategy, Policy and Compliance — introducing the Secretary-General’s report on the topic — said about 20 per cent of the overall cargo transported to date is destined for, or has already reached, countries classified by the World Bank as either low-income or lower-middle-income economies. That figure includes over 355,000 metric tons of wheat transported by the World Food Programme (WFP) to support humanitarian operations in Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa and Yemen.
Donna Marie Chiurazzi-Maxfield, Vice-Chair of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), introduced that body’s related report.
Also today, delegates discussed the financing of a newly established Panel of Experts on Haiti. Set up by the Security Council in October, the Panel is charged with supporting the Council and its Sanctions Committee monitoring implementation of a targeted arms embargo, travel ban and asset freeze on individuals and entities deemed responsible for threatening the country’s peace, security or stability.
Mr. Ramanathan introduced the Secretary-General’s report, which asks the Assembly to provide resources of about $1.4 million in 2023 to enable the Secretariat to carry out Council resolution 2653 (2022), which established the sanctions regime and Sanctions Committee on Haiti. Ms. Chiurazzi-Maxfield introduced the Advisory Committee’s related report.
The representative of Haiti, aligning himself with the recommendations of the Secretary-General and the Advisory Committee, stressed the need for flexibility and agility in implementing the draft budget. “The presentation of this draft budget with resources for the functioning of the expert group on Haiti is for us a decisive step because it gives sense to resolution 2653 (2022) of the Security Council,” he said, spotlighting his country’s gradual progress in implementing the strategic objectives for which that resolution was adopted.
Turning to the 2023 financing needs of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, Pakistan’s delegate, speaking for the Group of 77 and China, said Lebanon’s unprecedented socioeconomic and financial crisis has led to its first-ever default on its debts and the inability to cover its 49 per cent share of contributions to the Tribunal, which was created in 2007. Noting that despite fundraising efforts, voluntary contributions to the Tribunal have declined and there were no pledged contributions for 2023 at the time of reporting, he urged Member States to stand firmly with the people of Lebanon and international justice by approving the Secretary-General’s request for a final subvention of $2.9 million. He pointed out that this figure is $4.0 million less than last year’s subvention.
Mr. Ramanathan introduced the Secretariat report on this issue while Ms. Chiurazzi-Maxfield introduced the Advisory Committee’s related report.
In its first order of business today, delegates considered the Organization’s new information and communications technology strategy, as laid out in a report introduced by Bernardo Mariano Joaquim Junior, Chief Information Technology Officer and Assistant Secretary-General of the Office of Information and Communications Technology. The current document covers five strategic technology areas that will achieve three main strategic outcomes. Ms. Chiurazzi-Maxfield introduced the Advisory Committee’s related report.
The Fifth Committee will reconvene at 10 a.m. on Friday, 9 December, to discuss the financial performance report on the budget of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals for 2021.
Information and Communications Technology
BERNARDO MARIANO JOAQUIM JUNIOR, Chief Information Technology Officer and Assistant Secretary-General of the Office of Information and Communications Technology, introduced the Secretary-General’s new information and communications technology (ICT) strategy (document A/77/489). The previous ICT strategy, he pointed out, had a different format in that it contained a mix of strategic targets, summarized implementation plans and missed a detailed requirement investment. The current document is not operational but rather strategic, he stressed. It covers five strategic technology areas that will achieve three main strategic outcomes: serve the Organization’s entities to help them deliver on their mandates; enable digital transformation through innovation and partnership; and safeguard and secure the Secretariat’s information assets. The current format enables the strategy to be “on point” and relevant to any reader for a period of up to five years from now, he said.
The underlying intent of the strategy, he explained, is to move the Organization to a higher level of ICT maturity and place its work as a driver for technology. To achieve the strategic outcomes, three other documents are important: the capital investment plan, which needs to be resubmitted with the inclusion of tangible and intangible assets that are not currently listed; the implementation roadmap; and the operating model, which adjusts structured governance and will dictate the strategy’s successful implementation and achievement. In noting that the Organization has learned and improved, he emphasized that this split will allow Member States to associate cause and effect and track implementation throughout the strategy’s validity.
DONNA MARIE CHIURAZZI-MAXFIELD, Vice-Chair of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), introduced that body’s related report (document A/77/7/Add.22). In the report, the Advisory Committee considers that the proposed strategy, in its current formulation, is not adequately articulated and developed to chart the direction of all the Organization’s ICT activities for the next five years. Essential elements of the strategy, such as baselines, objectives, governance mechanisms and expected balance between central control and operational freedom, remain undefined, ambiguous, or to be developed at a later stage.
The ACABQ, she said, therefore recommends that the Secretary-General submit, for the Assembly’s consideration at the main part of its seventy-eighth session, a comprehensive report on ICT containing a revised ICT strategy that clearly states its vision and intended objectives, and identifies concrete actions to achieve them, taking into account current status, challenges, risks, efficiencies, lessons learned and interlinkages with related initiatives; a detailed, time-bound implementation road map with comprehensive governance arrangements and an accountability framework; and baseline information, including on resources and indicative cost estimates for the strategy’s implementation.
She highlighted critical areas requiring further clarification, development and update in the revised strategy and implementation road map. The Advisory Committee recommends that the Secretary-General ensure that the Chief Information Technology Officer is fully involved in the technical review of key ICT projects and initiatives, the entities’ budget proposals, and global expenditures in order to verify compliance with the ICT governance, ensure alignment with the overall direction of ICT and maximize efficiencies, she said. The ACABQ also stresses the need for strengthened governance and oversight mechanisms, supported by a clear and effective accountability framework, and recommends that the Secretary-General carry out critical measures to address significant risks and weaknesses noted by the oversight bodies and the Advisory Committee over the years.
PHILIPPE KRIDELKA (Belgium), Fifth Committee Chair, then drew the Committee’s attention to the report of the Joint Inspection Unit titled “Cybersecurity in the United Nations system organizations” (document JIU/REP/2021/3) and the note of the Secretary-General conveying his comments and those of the United Nations System Chief Executives Board for Coordination thereon (document A/77/88).
JIBRAN KHAN DURRANI (Pakistan), speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, welcomed the five-year ICT strategy plan 2023-2028, which focuses on five technological areas: enterprise infrastructure and systems; experience and alignment; data and information; technology innovation; and technology and data ecosystem. The strategy, he pointed out, aims to serve the United Nations entities by helping them deliver their mandates, enable digital transformation through innovation and secure the Secretariat’s information assets. He noted that under the proposed strategy, ICT will be integrated and symbiotic with the Organization’s priorities and achieve a holistic coherence in the Secretariat entities’ overall workings. Considering the important contributions of the previous strategy, he said the current strategy aims to move the Organization’s ICT infrastructure to the next level.
As the Organization’s legacy infrastructure has aged, its replacement must be carefully planned, he said, welcoming the assessment detailing the replacement cycle of mobile devices, laptops and desktop computers across the Secretariat, as well as their actual usage. He noted the results will be provided in a subsequent update. The Group notes that the increasing interdependence and interconnectivity of the Secretariat’s digital environment requires a consistent, closely coordinated and transparent approach to cybersecurity, he said. This will help all Secretariat entities comply with basic practices, policies and standards while establishing accountability and providing global visibility and oversight, in line with Assembly resolution 69/262.
Mr. KRIDELKA (Belgium), Fifth Committee Chair, said the consideration of the reports just introduced will be deferred to the first part of the resumed seventy-seventh session. This will be reflected in the Fifth Committee’s decision on “questions deferred for future consideration”, which will be adopted formally at the closing meeting of the main session.
Special Political Missions — Panel of Experts on Haiti
CHANDRAMOULI RAMANATHAN, Controller and Assistant Secretary-General of Programme Planning, Finance and Budget in the Department of Management Strategy, Policy and Compliance, introduced the Secretary-General’s report pertaining to the newly established Panel of Experts on Haiti, under the proposed programme budget for 2023 for special political missions, titled “Thematic cluster II: sanctions monitoring teams, groups and panels, and other entities and mechanisms” (document A/77/6(Sect.3)/Add.8).
Security Council resolution 2653 (2022), adopted on 21 October 2022, established a sanctions regime on Haiti that imposed a targeted arms embargo, travel ban and asset freeze on individuals and entities designated by the Council or its Sanctions Committee for being responsible for threatening the country’s peace, security or stability, he said. With the same resolution, the Council established a Sanctions Committee to monitor the implementation of the travel ban, asset freeze and the targeted arms embargo. To support the Council and its Sanctions Committee, the Secretary-General was asked to create, for an initial period of 13 months, a Panel of Experts comprising four experts and to establish the necessary financial and security arrangements to support its work.
To support the Panel, the Assembly is asked to approve proposed resources of $300,300 for civilian personnel costs related to the proposed establishment of three positions; $1.1 million for operational costs, including the fees of the experts and their associated travel costs for mandated activities; and $34,100 under section 36, Staff assessment, of the proposed programme budget for 2023. The latter amount will be offset by an equivalent amount under Income section 1, Income from staff assessment, he said.
Ms. CHIURAZZI-MAXFIELD, ACABQ Vice-Chair, introduced that body’s related report on the Panel of Experts on Haiti (document A/77/7/Add.25). She said the Advisory Committee recommended the approval of the civilian resources proposed for 2023, namely, $300,300 for the proposed establishment of three international positions to support the work of the Panel. On operational costs, the Advisory Committee noted the increased capabilities for security services under United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti (BINUH) proposed for 2023 and stressed that every effort should be made to use existing resources for security services as appropriate. There are multiple administrative support arrangements in place for thematic cluster II special political arrangements on which the Advisory Committee will comment in its next report on budget proposals, she indicated. The Advisory Committee then recommended the approval of the Secretary-General’s proposed operational costs of $1.11 million for 2023.
GUENSY BETOR (Haiti) aligned himself with the recommendations of the Secretary-General and the ACABQ. “The presentation of this draft budget with resources for the functioning of the expert group on Haiti is for us a decisive step because it gives sense to resolution 2653 (2022) of the Security Council,” he said as he spotlighted his country’s gradual progress in implementing the strategic objectives for which that resolution was adopted. The transparent procedure established in the selection of experts, he underscored, augurs well in terms of their competence to fulfil their tasks and their geographic representativeness. Turning to the complexity of the Haitian crisis, he stressed the need for a great deal of flexibility and agility in implementing the draft budget. There must be the necessary capacities to ensure changes in response to the realities on the ground.
Revised Estimates — Global Food Security
Mr. RAMANATHAN then took the floor again to introduce the Secretary-General’s report on revised estimates on United Nations activities to mitigate global food insecurity and its humanitarian impact (document A/77/576). He said the report is presented as the world faces unprecedented levels of food insecurity, due to a combination of factors, including armed conflict, significant increases in fuel and energy prices and the COVID‑19 pandemic. Noting that the Russian Federation and Ukraine are leading suppliers of foodstuffs and fertilizers to global markets and net exporters of agricultural products, he said a large number of food- and fertilizer-importing countries — many in the least developed country and low-income, food-deficit country groups — rely on Ukrainian and Russian food and fertilizers.
He highlighted two initiatives signed on 22 July 2022 – a memorandum of understanding between the Russian Federation and the Secretariat to enable unimpeded access of Russian food products and fertilizers, which are not subject to sanctions, to global markets (known as the Trade Facilitation Initiative), and the Black Sea Grain Initiative between Türkiye, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, with the Secretary-General signing as a witness. Under the latter Initiative — aimed at enabling the safe transportation of grain and related foodstuffs and fertilizers, including ammonia, from three designated Ukrainian ports — he said about 20 per cent of the overall cargo transported to date is destined for, or has already reached, countries classified by the World Bank as either low-income or lower-middle-income economies. That includes over 355,000 metric tons of wheat transported by the World Food Programme (WFP) to support humanitarian operations in Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa and Yemen. The Initiative’s impacts are being felt far beyond immediate ports of arrival, he observed, with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reporting that the confirmation of the Initiative’s extension in November contributed to a 2.8 per cent decline in global wheat prices.
To sustain United Nations assistance to support the two initiatives, he said additional resource for 2023 of $10.9 million — comprising $2.3 million under Section 12, Trade and development; $7.9 million under Section 27, Humanitarian assistance; and $0.7 million under Section 36, Staff assessment — are required. The Assembly is asked to let the Secretary-General enter into commitments that would not exceed $10.94 million, with corresponding assessment, and the commitment authority’s use would be reported in the 2023 financial performance report. After recent consultations between the WFP and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), WFP has agreed to extend in 2023 the current arrangement on its non-reimbursable loan for the D‑2 position of Director of the Task Team. This would reduce the estimate included in the Secretary-General’s report by $302,400, he said.
Ms. CHIURAZZI-MAXFIELD, ACABQ Vice-Chair, introduced that body’s eponymous report (document A/77/7/Add.26). Taking into consideration the established practice for approving resource requirements of a full budget period, the level of expenditures for 2022 and the avoidance of setting a precedent for a full-year commitment authority with assessment, she said the Advisory Committee recommended the Assembly approve an appropriation for the additional resource requirements requested for 2023.
Under the Memorandum of Understanding on Trade Facilitation, the Advisory Committee recommended a reduction of 5 per cent ($35,100) to the proposed provision under consultants and 5 per cent to the proposed resource estimates under staff travel for 2023. More efforts should be made to utilize in-house capacities, especially for core functions such as those in UNCTAD’s Communications and External Relations Section. Trips to nearby destinations should be combined to the extent possible, particularly those within the same country, she added. On the proposed Special Adviser position at the D‑2 level, she said the Advisory Committee trusts that updated information on the WFP’s consideration of an extension of the current arrangement for the non-reimbursable loan of the position will be provided to the Assembly. Subject to that body’s decision, a 50 per cent vacancy rate should be applied to the proposed new position under the regular budget for 2023.
Turning to the requested resource requirements for the implementation of the Black Sea Grain Initiative, the Advisory Committee recognized the essential role of the inspection services of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and noted the ongoing discussions on increasing the number of inspectors for 2023. As further efforts can be made to rationalize the use of resources, the Advisory Committee recommended a reduction of 5 per cent ($163,100) to the proposed resources under grants and contributions for 2023. More detailed information on the accessibility and beneficial impact of both initiatives for Member States, especially for least developed countries and low-income, food-deficit countries, should be included in the Secretary-General’s next report, she indicated.
Mr. KHAN DURRANI (Pakistan), taking the floor again on behalf of the Group of 77 and China, expressed its deep concern with the current state of global food insecurity, which is exacerbating humanitarian needs and increasing the risk of famine around the world. A sudden spike in global prices of wheat, other food supplies and essential fertilizers has put the food security of many vulnerable countries at risk. The Group welcomes the Fifth Committee’s constructive engagement and adoption of resolution A/77/7/3 on 27 October 2022 to authorize $3.5 million in spending in 2022 to carry out the two initiatives. He noted the total 2023 resource requirement of $10.9 million, includes $2.3 million to support the Trade Facilitation Initiative and $7.89 million for the Black Sea Grain Initiative. The Group expects all stakeholders to work constructively as they acknowledge the urgent needs of developing countries and support the provision of the required resources for 2023, he stressed.
NACI YILDIZ (Türkiye), in noting the successful extension of the Istanbul agreement for an additional four months and the export of over 13 million tons of grain so far, emphasized that this initiative is a two-way street. The Russian Federation’s grain and fertilizers should not be blocked, he said while welcoming the steps to remove indirect obstacles. Since the export of grain from Ukraine and the Russian Federation is crucial for global food security, Türkiye is currently looking into ways of boosting the volume of the next harvest’s exported grain. This issue must be kept separate from the developments on the ground, he stressed. He then commended the valuable work of the Joint Coordination Centre and its personnel in monitoring the operation and expressed his country’s full support to the Secretary-General’s request.
VADIM N. LAPUTIN (Russian Federation) reaffirmed the significant achievements of the Istanbul agreement and its contribution to the stabilization of food markets as well as the value of the mediation role played by Türkiye and United Nations assistance. Pointing out that his delegation explained its detailed position on this agenda item in October, he again asked the Secretariat for updated and detailed information about number of developing countries, especially least developed, low-income and food-deficit countries, which are receiving supplies through the Black Sea Grain Initiative.
Special Tribunal for Lebanon
Mr. RAMANATHAN, Controller, Assistant Secretary-General for Programme Planning, Finance and Budget in the Department of Management Strategy, Policy and Compliance, introduced the Secretary-General’s report on the use of the 2022 subvention to the Special Tribunal for Lebanon and request for a subvention for 2023 (documents A/77/548 and Corr.1). He noted the Tribunal has undertaken significant efforts and worked diligently to complete the judicial proceedings in the main case (STL‑11‑01) since the Secretary-General’s previous request. With the appeal and sentencing judgements in that case delivered in March and June of 2022, the Tribunal has completed its judicial work and moved to its residual phase as of 1 July 2022.
The United Nations and Lebanon, he said, have agreed to a completion plan whereby the Tribunal will perform its limited residual functions from 1 July 2022 through the end of 2023 while completing its closure and liquidation activities in parallel by 31 December 2023. In August 2022, the Tribunal’s Management Committee approved a budget of $2.97 million for 2023 which reflects the absolute minimum requirements for the realization of this completion plan, including the Tribunal’s closure, and accounts for the primary focus on preserving its archives and evidence. Although the 2022 financial shortfall was ultimately resolved, there are currently to pledged voluntary contributions for the Tribunal for 2023. Its activities, while ambitious, are operationally achievable if sufficiently financed, he underscored.
He then indicated that section VIII of the report outlines proposed actions. The Assembly is requested to appropriate an amount of $2.97 million under section 8 (Legal affairs) of the proposed programme budget for 2023 by way of a subvention with the understanding that any additional voluntary contributions received would reduce the utilization of the funding provided by the United Nations. It is also requested to note that the transfer of the Tribunal’s records and archives to the Organization may have budgetary implications, in particular under section 29B (Department of Operational Support). Resource proposals would be submitted to the Assembly in line with budgetary procedures.
Ms. CHIURAZZI-MAXFIELD, ACABQ Vice-Chair, introduced that body’s related report (document A/77/7/Add.24). Acknowledging the Tribunal’s efforts to complete its work as the first United Nations Tribunal to achieve the completion of its mandate, she said the Advisory Committee trusts that lessons learned and best practices will be collated and shared with relevant entities of the Organization. The Advisory Committee, she continued, notes the importance of all residual functions and stresses that measures will continue to ensure the protection of victims and witnesses in accordance with the agreement between the Organization and Lebanon.
Noting with concern the lack of projected voluntary contributions for 2023, the Advisory Committee recommended that the Assembly encourage all Member States to provide voluntary support to the Tribunal, she said. It should also request the Secretary-General to intensify his efforts in this regard. In light of the Tribunal’s persistent funding challenges, cost-reduction measures and cost-efficiency efforts should continue during the residual phase and in the implementation of its completion plan.
Subvention, she underscored, acts as an exceptional bridging mechanism until voluntary contributions are received. To that end, the Advisory Committee recommends the Assembly appropriate $2.97 million under section 8 (Legal affairs) of the programme budget for 2023 by way of a subvention to the Tribunal. It further recommended that this subvention be approved on the conditions that the Secretary-General continue his efforts to increase voluntary contributions; the subvention be subsequently reimbursed from voluntary contributions received and returned to Member States; appropriate measures for achieving savings and efficiencies during the residual phase continue; and its funding and utilization be reflected in the financial performance report for 2023.
She then thanked the Fifth Committee for the opportunity to serve since today was her last appearance before the Fifth Committee and as an ACABQ member. She shared that she had completed 45 years of service to the United Nations, the last three of which were with the Advisory Committee. “It has been my deepest honour to contribute in a new and different way. I hope I have lived up to the trust you have placed in me,” she said as she wished the Fifth Committee great success in guiding and directing the Organization in all administrative and budgetary matters.
JIBRAN KHAN DURRANI, speaking again on behalf of the Group of 77 and China, commended Lebanon for consistently honouring its financial obligation to the Tribunal since its establishment in 2007. The current, unprecedented socioeconomic and financial crisis in that country, he underscored, has resulted in its first-ever default on its debts and the inability to cover its 49 per cent share of contributions to the Tribunal. Despite the subvention granted for 2022, the Tribunal faced a significant funding shortfall in the first half of that year. To avoid liquidation, Lebanon pledged $900,000; the Tribunal intensified its fundraising efforts; and its Appeals Chamber rendered its appeal judgment one month earlier than originally planned, which allowed for cost reductions. Despite fundraising efforts, voluntary contributions have continued to decline from $22.7 to $8.1 million in 2021 and a projected $1 million in 2022, he pointed out. There were no pledged contributions for 2023 at the time of reporting, he added.
Turning to the agreement of a completion plan between the United Nations and Lebanon, he noted that a final renewal of the Tribunal’s mandate would be limited to a non-judicial mandate. During this residual phase, the Tribunal will perform its drawdown activities, manage and preserve its records and archives, support the protection of witnesses and victims, assist national authorities and respond to information requests. The Tribunal is the first United Nations ad hoc tribunal to close following the completion of residual functions, he underscored. The final subvention request of $2.9 million, he continued, represents a significant decrease of $4.0 million when compared to last year’s subvention. Member States must stand firmly with the people of Lebanon and international justice by approving the Secretary-General’s request, he urged.
GREG GARRAMONE (United States) thanked Ms. Chiurazzi-Maxfield for her 45 years of public service dedicated to an efficient, effective and productive United Nations in service of peace and prosperity for all.
United Nations Common System
Mr. KRIDELKA (Belgium), Fifth Committee Chair, then drew the Committee’s attention to the Secretary-General’s note on comments of the judges of the United Nations Dispute Tribunal on the proposal of the Fifth Committee for the amendment to the statute of the International Civil Service Commission (document A/C.5/77/24).
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