Diaspora

As Haiti's gang violence escalates, check out these 10 stories – The New Humanitarian

Gun battles have spread in the capital, and civilians are being caught in the crossfire.
Gang violence, which has been escalating for months in Haiti, led to at least 209 people being killed in the capital, Port-au-Prince, in the 10 days between 8 July and 17 July, according to UN figures.
 
Roughly half of these killings – more than 20 each day on average – were of civilians with no known gang links. At least 254 more received gunshot wounds. Intense firefights, usually confined to strategic hotspots or shantytowns like Cité Soleil, were reported in the heart of the capital on 27 July.
 
Since the assassination of president Jovenel Moïse in July 2021 and an earthquake the following month that killed thousands in the Caribbean nation’s southern peninsula, The New Humanitarian has stepped up its reporting.
 
Here’s a collection of our recent work that aims to give voice to those affected while highlighting the challenges for those searching for a path forward.
*/
 

After gaining rare access to current and former gang members, The New Humanitarian published this short film in February exploring not only how gang violence had paralysed the Caribbean country and prevented crucial aid from getting to millions of hungry and displaced people, but also how it was trapping a generation of children in a cycle of abuse and despair.
*/
 
 
Haiti has one of the youngest populations in the Caribbean, but without jobs or opportunities, many have turned to gangs for quick cash and power.
*/
 

Lack of trust, feelings of shame, and not enough information characterise the experience of receiving aid, a survey reveals.
*/
 

With 2.5 million in need living in areas under armed control, aid groups have to find ways to work with the gangs despite the escalating violence.
*/
 

Years of political unrest, under-investment in agriculture, and repeated earthquakes and storms have left 4.3 million people facing acute hunger.
*/
 

“Build back better” became a guiding mantra after calamity struck in 2010, but Haiti has struggled to follow it and prepare for future disasters.
*/
 

Between foreign intervention, natural disasters, and the debilitating impact of an unaccountable aid system, the country has become unlivable.
*/
 

Due to a string of setbacks over the last decade and a recent economic crunch, the country was in danger of unravelling even before COVID-19.
*/
 

A catastrophic earthquake on 12 January 2010 crushed much of Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, in one of the worst natural disasters ever to strike a populous urban centre. Ten years on, the nation is on the brink of another, very different, crisis.
*/
 

Hundreds of thousands of people of Haitian descent living in the Dominican Republic are at risk of arbitrary deportation or of becoming stateless. Even though many were born in the Dominican Republic or have lived there for decades, tens of thousands have either been forcibly deported or have fled the crackdown and legal uncertainty.
Hundreds of thousands of readers trust The New Humanitarian each month for quality journalism that contributes to more effective, accountable, and inclusive ways to improve the lives of people affected by crises.
Our award-winning stories inform policymakers and humanitarians, demand accountability and transparency from those meant to help people in need, and provide a platform for conversation and discussion with and among affected and marginalised people.
We’re able to continue doing this thanks to the support of our donors and readers like you who believe in the power of independent journalism. These contributions help keep our journalism free and accessible to all.
Show your support as we build the future of news media by becoming a member of The New Humanitarian. 
Sign up to receive our original, on-the-ground coverage that informs policymakers, practitioners, donors, and others who want to make the world more humane.
Sign up
Support our journalism and become more involved in our community. Help us deliver informative, accessible, independent journalism that you can trust and provides accountability to the millions of people affected by crises worldwide.
Join
© All rights reserved 2022

source

What's your reaction?

Excited
0
Happy
0
In Love
0
Not Sure
0
Silly
0

You may also like

More in:Diaspora

Comments are closed.