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Agweek TV Full Show: It's the holiday special, where Agweek TV … – Agweek

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This week a special holiday edition of Agweek TV takes a look at some of our favorite and most popular stories of the past year. We’ll also share some updates on stories since they first aired.
WELCOME TO OUR ANNUAL AGWEEK TV HOLIDAY SPECIAL. WE’RE AT SUPERIOR GRAIN EQUIPMENT IN KINDRED, NORTH DAKOTA. WE HOPE YOU’RE HAVING A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS.
THIS WEEK, INSTEAD OF OUR USUAL SHOW, WE’RE TAKING A LOOK BACK AT SOME OF OUR FAVORITE, AND MOST POPULAR STORIES FROM 2022. WE BEGIN WITH ONE WE’VE BEEN FOLLOWING FOR SEVERAL YEARS.
AN AGRIBUSINESS ON THE ISLAND NATION OF HAITI, WITH TIES TO NORTH DAKOTA, HAS FACED SOME MAJOR CHALLENGES, IN ITS EFFORTS TO HELP ITS PEOPLE.
JENNY SCHLECHT HAS BEEN REPORTING ON JOHN DRAXTON’S MEAT PROCESSING EFFORTS IN THE IMPOVERISHED COUNTRY.
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JENNY, THE LAST WE HEARD, JOHN WAS TRYING TO RAISE MONEY TO CONVERT TO SOLAR POWER…
Jenny: THAT’S RIGHT, EMILY. JOHN DRAXTON, FROM NORTHWOOD, NORTH DAKOTA, STARTED ‘FARMER JOHN’S HAITI’ ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO. THE MEAT PROCESSING COMPANY PROVIDES SUSTAINABLE, SANITARY MEAT, AND JOBS, TO THE STRUGGLING COUNTRY.
BUT POLITICAL UPHEAVAL, GANG VIOLENCE, FUEL SHORTAGES AND FUEL PRICE SPIKES PUSHED FARMER JOHN’S TO MOVE TO SOLAR POWER.
IN A YOUTUBE VIDEO, DRAXTON SAID THE BUSINESS HAS GROWN TO THIRTY EMPLOYEES, AND BUYS ANIMALS FROM 200 FARMERS. IT’S A HUGE BOON TO THE ECONOMY, BUT DRAXTON SAID THEY WERE ON THE VERGE OF CLOSING IF THEY COULDN’T CONVERT TO RELIABLE SOLAR POWER.
JOHN: WELL I’M STANDING IN THE SOLAR ROOM. UNBELIEVABLE. I CAN’T BELIEVE THIS HAPPENED THIS FAST. WE JUST, THE FUEL PRICES WENT UP AND WE NEEDED SOLAR AND IN 3 MONTHS, HERE WE ARE. THE WHOLE BUTCHER SHOP IS RUNNING ON SOLAR RIGHT NOW. IT’S SEVEN IN THE MORNING AND THE PANELS ARE PROVIDING ENOUGH POWER TO RUN EVERYTHING. IT’S UNBELIEVABLE.
SOLAR POWER HAS BEEN PROVIDING ELECTRICITY AT FARMER JOHN’S SINCE MID-NOVEMBER. MONEY FOR THE 300 THOUSAND DOLLAR PROJECT WAS RAISED THROUGH A FUNDRAISER. JOHN SAYS NOW THEY ONLY NEED TO BUY A SMALL AMOUNT OF FUEL TO RUN GENERATORS, BUT THE FUEL STILL HAS TO COME FROM THE BLACK MARKET.
BUT VIOLENCE AND TURMOIL IN HAITI CONTINUE TO HINDER THEIR MEAT DELIVERIES IN THE COUNTRY. YOU CAN LEARN MORE ABOUT THE BUSINESS ON THEIR FACEBOOK PAGE, FARMER JOHNS HAITI
Emily: STILL SOME CHALLENGES, BUT HE’S CERTAINLY DOING A GREAT JOB. THANKS, JENNY.
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CLOSER TO HOME, A SMALL FARMING VENTURE IS HELPING NEW AMERICANS GET STARTED GROWING AND SELLING THEIR OWN CROPS.
JEFF BEACH, YOU VISITED THE NEW ROOTS CO-OP. TELL US MORE ABOUT IT.
Jeff: FARMERS FROM SEVERAL COUNTRIES WHO’VE RECENTLY COME TO THE U.S. HAVE THE CHANCE TO GROW CROPS TO SELL, AT THIS SMALL FARM NORTH OF MOORHEAD, MINNESOTA.
Simeon Bakunda: CHERRY TOMATOES, CORN, GREEN BEANS, PEAS, EVERYTHING.
SIMEON BAKUNDA CAME TO THE U.S. FROM CONGO EIGHTEEN YEARS AGO. THIS IS HIS FOURTH YEAR AS A MEMBER OF THE NEW ROOTS CO-OP.
Am I picking the right size? Yes, that’s the right size. Okay, good.
HE WAS ACTIVE IN A COMMUNITY GARDEN FOR SEVERAL YEARS BEFORE THAT. BUT HE WANTED TO EXPAND, GROWING FOOD FROM HIS HOME COUNTRY, ESPECIALLY HIS FAVORITE AFRICAN EGGPLANT.
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IN ADDITION TO GROWING FOR HIS FAMILY, BAKUNDA SELLS HIS PRODUCE AT FARMERS MARKETS AND ETHNIC GROCERY STORES.
.
Simeon Bakunda: OUR CUSTOMERS KNOW WHERE WE GROW STUFF. THEY LIKE OUR STUFF. WE’RE SO PROUD TO BE PART OF CONTRIBUTING TO FEEDING THE COMMUNITY.
THE NEW ROOTS INCUBATOR HAS TWELVE MEMBERS THIS YEAR. THEY ARE WORKING TO EXPAND ON SIXTY ACRES NEAR THE PRAIRIE ROSE FARM AT FELTON, MINNESOTA, FOR THE 2023 GROWING SEASON.
Verna: IT’S GORGEOUS. IT LOOKS LIKE THINGS ARE GOING REALLY WELL THIS YEAR? YES!
VERNA KRAGNES IS ONE OF THE CO-OP’S FOUNDERS, AND HELPED RAISE MONEY TO GET IT STARTED, AND NOW, TO GROW.
THE INCUBATOR GIVES FARMERS SUPPORT THEY NEED FROM EQUIPMENT, TO MARKETING.
Verna Kragnes: THAT’S WHAT WE’RE REALLY EXCITED ABOUT WITH NEW ROOTS, IS TO SEE IN THE FUTURE MORE AND MORE FARMS THAT HAVE GOTTEN THEMSELVES LAUNCHED AND SUCCESSFULLY OPERATING.
A QUALIFYING FARMER WILL BECOME ELIGIBLE FOR HELP, SUCH AS CROP INSURANCE, THROUGH THE FARM SERVICE AGENCY.
JEFF: SO A LOT OF THESE VEGETABLES ARE NEW TO YOU? YES, YES!
MOHAN DHAKAL AND HIS WIFE CAME FROM BHUTAN IN 2014, WHERE THEY HAD BEEN FARMERS. SO THIS SMALL PIECE OF LAND FEELS LIKE HOME.
Mohan Dhakal: WE ARE HAPPY TO HAVE THIS, SO THIS GARDEN IS GOOD FOR US.
Verna: OH WOW, LOOK AT THAT! YEAH. THAT’S GREAT! THIS IS GREAT!
JEFF: THE FARM LAUNCHED A CAMPAIGN TO RAISE HALF A MILLION DOLLARS TO BUY THE LAND, BUT THEY DIDN’T MAKE IT. SO THEY’RE LOOKING FOR OTHER LAND TO LEASE OR LEASE-PURCHASE.
ONE FARMER THAT STARTED WITH NEW ROOTS WAS ABLE TO QUALIFY FOR AN FSA LOAN, AND BUY 12 ACRES OF HIS OWN.
Emily: THANKS, JEFF. WE WISH THEM WELL IN THE FUTURE.

MOLLY YEH HAS BECOME A STAR ON THE NATIONAL FOOD SCENE. SHE’S A COOKBOOK AUTHOR, AND HAS A SHOW ON THE FOOD NETWORK. BUT HOW DID SHE END UP ON HER FARM, RIGHT OUTSIDE OF EAST GRAND FORKS, MINNESOTA?
AGWEEK REPORTER ANNE BAILEY TALKED TO MOLLY’S HUSBAND, NICK HAGEN, THE MAN BEHIND THE FARM. NICK IS THE FIFTH GENERATION TO FARM THERE. BUT HE DIDN’T ALWAYS PLAN TO DO THAT. AFTER GRADUATING FROM EAST GRAND FORKS HIGH SCHOOL IN 2005, HE ATTENDED THE PRESTIGIOUS JULLIARD SCHOOL IN NEW YORK CITY, HOPING FOR A CAREER IN MUSIC. AT JULLIARD, HE MET AN UNDERCLASSMAN NAMED MOLLY YEH. AFTER A COUPLE OF YEARS TOGETHER IN NEW YORK, THEY DECIDED TO MOVE BACK TO NICK’S HOMETOWN, AND FARM. THEY MADE THE MOVE IN THE SUMMER OF 2013, AND WERE MARRIED ON THE FARM TWO YEARS LATER.
Nick Hagen: IT WAS REALLY SPECIAL FOR ME THAT MOLLY WOULD WANT TO BE MARRIED, YOU KNOW, ON THIS FARM AND LIKE, MAKE HER LIFE HERE.
IN SEPTEMBER, NICK AND MOLLY OPENED BERNIE’S, A RESTAURANT IN EAST GRAND FORKS. IT FEATURES REGIONAL CUISINE, LIKE HOTDISH AND COOKIE SALAD, MADE WITH LOCAL INGREDIENTS.
Nick: YOU KNOW, EVERYTHING’S FROM SCRATCH, YOU KNOW, I GUESS WE’RE TRYING TO ELEVATE IT IN A SENSE, BUT WE’RE ALSO TRYING TO MAKE IT VERY APPROACHABLE. A PLACE THAT REALLY CELEBRATES THIS PLACE.
THE CAFE IS GOING STRONG. REPORTS FROM THOSE WHO’VE BEEN THERE SAY THE FOOD IS EXCELLENT.

COMING UP ON THIS SPECIAL HOLIDAY EDITION OF AGWEEK TV, WE’LL MEET A SOUTH DAKOTA FARMER WHO’S HITTING ALL THE RIGHT NOTES.

FROM SUPERIOR GRAIN EQUIPMENT IN KINDRED, NORTH DAKOTA, YOU’RE WATCHING OUR HOLIDAY “BEST OF” EDITION OF AGWEEK TV.
MULTI-TASKING AND COOPERATION ARE COMMON ON THE FARM. BUT
MIKKEL PATES FOUND A WOMAN WHO TAKES THAT TO A WHOLE, NEW LEVEL.
MIKKEL, WHAT MAKES ANNE WALTNER UNIQUE?
WELL EMILY, ANNE IS A CONCERT PIANIST….WHO CAME BACK TO THE FAMILY FARM. NOT TO MENTION, SHE HAS TRIPLETS!
**sounds of piano playing**
Anne Waltner: I WOULD ALWAYS HAVE CONSIDERED MYSELF A PIANIST FIRST.
Mikkel Pates: ANN WALTNER CAME BACK FROM A CONCERT PIANIST CAREER TO JOIN THE FAMILY FARM, BUT SHE ALSO BECAME A WIFE, MOTHER OF TRIPLETS AND A CANCER SURVIVOR.
Anne Waltner: I NEVER UNDERSTOOD THAT I HAD TO BE A CERTAIN THING.
WITHIN A STRONG MENNONITE AG AND ARTS HERITAGE, WALTNER MAJORED IN BIOLOGY AND PIANO PERFORMANCE IN COLLEGE. THAT LED HER INTO A STINT TEACHING IN INDIA.
Anne Waltner: IT WAS AN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL ON THE SIDE OF A MOUNTAIN.
SHE WENT ON TO GET MASTER’S AND DOCTORATE DEGREES IN PIANO PERFORMANCE, AND TAUGHT AT COLLEGES IN THE EAST FOR A SEVERAL YEARS. BUT SHE WAS STILL LOOKING FOR HER PATH IN LIFE. WHEN SHE WAS IN COLLEGE, SHE’D OCCASIONALLY HELPED HER PARENTS BACK ON THE FARM. AND TEN YEARS LATER, FROM 2010 TO 2015, SHE RENTED SOYBEAN AND CORN ACRES FROM THEM ON HER OWN. AND IN 2016 SHE CAME HOME TO BE A FULL PARTNER WITH THEM IN THE 1,600-ACRE CORN AND SOYBEAN FARM. KEITH AND SHARON WALTNER ARE HAPPY ANNE IS COMING ALONGSIDE.
Keith Waltner: SHE’S INTUITIVE, SHE WAS GOOD WITH MACHINERY, SHE WAS GOOD WITH LIVESTOCK.
WALTNER SAYS SHE’S COMFORTABLE WITH THE TECHNOLOGY SIDE OF FARMING, BUT STILL COUNTS ON HER DAD TO HELP FIX EQUIPMENT.
Anne Waltner: WHEN THE CHIPS ARE DOWN AND SOMETHING IS BROKEN, AND YOU’VE GOT TO FIND A WAY TO FIX IT EFFICIENTLY, THAT’S WHAT I’M NERVOUS ABOUT.
IN ADDITION TO A MAJOR CAREER CHANGE, THERE HAVE ALSO BEEN OTHER CHANGES IN WALTNER’S LIFE. IN 2015, SHE MARRIED ROLF OLSON, A COLLEGE MUSIC PROFESSOR — NOT A FARMER. IN 2017 SHE GAVE BIRTH TO TRIPLET GIRLS.
Some days I wake up and it’s like wow!
TWO YEARS LATER, SHE WAS DIAGNOSED WITH LEUKEMIA, BUT SHE IS DOING WELL WITH TREATMENT. AND IF THAT’S NOT ENOUGH, JUST LANDED A POST AS PRINCIPAL KEYBOARD PLAYER FOR THE SIOUX FALLS SYMPHONY, WHERE ROLF IS ALREADY IN THE TRUMPET SECTION.

SO IN A CAREER LIKE FARMING THAT ALWAYS TAKES A LOT OF COLLABORATION, THIS MUSICAL COLLABORATOR IS TAKING THINGS TO A NEW LEVEL.
Anne Waltner: I LOVE WHAT I DO, I’M WORKING WITH ALL MY FAVORITE PEOPLE.
I MEAN, WHO GETS TO DO THAT?
**sounds of clapping**
Mikkel: WHILE DROUGHT CUT INTO ANNE’S 2022 CROP PRODUCTION, HER MUSICAL CAREER IS GOING STRONG. SHE SCORED THE PRINCIPAL KEYBOARD JOBS WITH THE SOUTH DAKOTA SYMPHONY AND THE SIOUX CITY, IOWA SYMPHONY. HER HUSBAND ROLF IS A RETIRED BAND PROFESSOR WHO NOW TEACHES PART TIME. AND THEIR TRIPLETS ARE NOW FIVE.
Emily: THAT IS ONE BUSY FAMILY.
THANKS, MIKKEL.

THEY SAY A DOG IS MAN’S BEST FRIEND, BUT ONE LUCKY DOG HAS HUNDREDS OF FRIENDS, AND A VERY IMPORTANT JOB.
KATIE PINKE MET MAURA, A GOLDEN RETRIEVER WITH A COUPLE OF ROLES AT A NORTH DAKOTA HIGH SCHOOL.
IN FEBRUARY 2020, THE SMALL ANIMAL CARE CLASS IN HILLSBORO CREATED A PROPOSAL FOR A THERAPY DOG. THIS SCHOOL YEAR, IT CAME TO FRUITION, AND I HAD THE CHANCE TO VISIT THIS SPECIAL DOG.
**music**
Levi Reese: SO IT BRINGS ON THAT HANDS ON EXPERIENCE THAT THEY’RE NORMALLY NOT GOING TO GET. YOU CAN BRING A DOG IN FOR A DAY OR TWO, BUT THIS IS EVERY DAY. MOST DAYS THEY GET TO TRAIN THE DOG AND THEY GET TO SEE THE PROGRESS FROM DAY ONE TO THE END OF THE PROJECT.
Katie Pinke: JUST SX STUDENTS ARE IN THE SMALL ANIMAL CARE CLASS, AND ARE ALREADY LEARNING THE IMPORTANCE OF AGRICULTURE IN THEIR LIVES.
FERNANDO: WE’RE LEARNING HOW TO TRAIN A DOG, OF COURSE.
Now try to get her to sit. good girl, Maura.
LAST SEMESTER WE LEARNED A DOG’S ANATOMY, WE LEARNED HOW TO PROPERLY GROOM A DOG, HOW TO DO VET CHECKS, LIKE GIVE SHOTS.
Katie Pinke: THE THERAPY DOG PROPOSAL HAD THREE KEY OBJECTIVES — TO PROVIDE HANDS ON LEARNING EXPERIENCE FOR VETERINARY SCIENCE AND SMALL ANIMAL CARE CLASSES, TO PROVIDE COMFORT AND SUPPORT TO THE STUDENTS AND STAFF AT HILLSBORO PUBLIC SCHOOL…
Levi Reese: HAVING HER HERE HAS CHANGED MY OUTLOOK ON TEACHING AND WHAT I DO AND EVEN MY BUSINESS MANAGER SAID TODAY, SHE SAID YOU’RE IN A MUCH BETTER MOOD THAN YOU WERE EARLIER.
…AND TO REDUCE ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION IN HILLSBORO PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS.
Carolyn Hall: WHEN THEY SEE HER AND THEY JUST SMILE. THEY’RE HAPPY TO SEE HER. THEY GET DOWN AND PET HER, IT JUST LIKE GIVES THEM A LITTLE BREAK FROM SCHOOL AND THEY FEEL HAPPY IN THAT MOMENT. IT GIVES THEM A LITTLE MOMENT OF HAPPINESS.

Katie Pinke: MR.REESE’S GOAL IS FOR THERAPY DOGS TO GROW AMONG AG CLASS AND FFA CHAPTERS ACROSS THE REGION.
**music up**
Emily: KATIE, A LOT’S HAPPENED FOR MAURA SINCE THIS STORY AIRED.
Katie: IT HAS! SHE’S NOW A CERTIFIED “PET PARTNER” AND WHEN SHE’S NOT IN SCHOOL, SHE VISITS THE ROGER MARIS CANCER CENTER AND OTHER FACILITIES. MR. REESE HAS BEEN WORKING WITH NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY’S COLLEGE OF AG ABOUT DEVELOPING THERAPY DOG TRAINING STANDARDS.
AND SEVERAL SCHOOLS HAVE REACHED OUT FOR INFORMATION ABOUT GETTING THEIR OWN THERAPY DOG. YOU CAN EVEN FOLLOW MAURA ON SOCIAL MEDIA.
Emily: VERY COOL STORY! THANKS KATIE.

STILL AHEAD ON OUR HOLIDAY SHOW…
A STAR IN THE VINTAGE TRACTOR WORLD PAYS A VISIT TO THE STEAM THRESHERS REUNION.
AND WE’LL SEE WHY SOME GOATS ARE GETTING THEIR FILL OF WEEDS.

WELCOME BACK TO OUR HOLIDAY “FAVORITES” SPECIAL.
WITH THE HIGH PRICE OF DIESEL, THE TIME MIGHT BE RIGHT FOR A TRACTOR THAT RUNS ON KEROSENE. BUT IT’S NOT A NEW IDEA AT ALL.
ROSE DUNN GAVE US A LOOK AT ONE THAT VISITED THE REGION.
THIS YEAR’S WESTERN MINNESOTA STEAM THRESHERS REUNION IN ROLLAG, MINNESOTA, FEATURED A RUMELY EQUIPMENT DISPLAY. THE CENTERPIECE WAS A ONE-OF-A-KIND 1909 PROTOTYPE TRACTOR…KEROSENE ANNIE.
Rob Bearden: IT’S NOT SOMETHING THAT YOU JUST TURN A KEY ON AND START. EVERYTHING HAS TO BE OILED, EVERYTHING HAS TO BE PRIMED.
ROB BEARDEN IS ANNIE’S CARETAKER AT HER PERMANENT HOME AT THE JUMP TRACTOR MUSEUM IN BOISE, IDAHO.
give everybody a little squirt of oil…
ANNIE HADN’T RUN FOR DECADES WHEN SHE ARRIVED AT LUKE STEINBERGER’S SHOP NEAR HARWOOD, NORTH DAKOTA, TO GET READY FOR ROLLAG.
And then Luke will have it belted up to that tractor and once we get it spinning up, we’ll gradually float the clutch into it. And it’ll hopefully start up right away.
A TEAM OF LOCAL MECHANICS QUICKLY GOT HER RUNNING AGAIN.
*sound of engine starting**
Luke Steinberger: WITHIN NINE DAYS WE HAD THREE HUNDRED HOURS OF MAN LABOR INTO IT.
Rob Bearden: ONCE WE GOT IT RUNNING, THE FIRST FIRE, BOY IT WAS PRETTY EXCITING TO HEAR THIS THING RUN FOR THE FIRST TIME.
THE IDEA OF KEROSENE ENGINES WAS DEVELOPED IN THE EARLY 1900S AS A CHEAP FUEL SOURCE, BEFORE DIESEL BECAME MORE POPULAR IN THE 1930S.
*sound of engine running**
Rose Dunn: ANNIE WAS USED AS A PROTOTYPE FOR JUST ONE YEAR AND THEN SAT BEHIND THE RUMELY FACTORY IN LAPORTE, INDIANA UNTIL THE FIFTIES, WHEN SHE WAS DISCOVERED BY A COLLECTOR AND RESTORED.
Rob Bearden: THE WHOLE TRACTOR IS ACTUALLY BRAND NEW, THERE’S VERY LITTLE TIME ON IT. ALL THE GEARS ARE ALL NEW, ALL THE INSIDE OF THE ENGINE IS PRETTY MUCH NEW.
Luke Steinberger: SO MY GREAT GRANDPARENTS FARMED WITH RUMELYS IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA AROUND MINOT…
STEINBERGER’S LIFETIME LOVE OF RUMLEYS PROMPTED HIM TO START WORKING TO BRING AN EXHIBIT TO THE ROLLAG REUNION. IT’S TAKEN SEVERAL YEARS OF PLANNING, AND THE HELP OF SEVERAL SPONSORS, BUT IT’S FINALLY COMING TO LIFE. THE EXPO WILL FEATURE FIVE ONE-OF-A-KIND RUMLEYS.
Luke Steinberger: WE NEED TO BRING NEW THINGS THAT THEY HAVEN’T SEEN JUST TO KEEP THINGS FRESH TOO. AND THERE WOULD BE NOTHING GREATER THAN KEROSENE ANNIE TO DO THAT, SOMETHING TO BE SEEN AND TOUCHED AND FELT AND HEARD. AND ACTUALLY USED.
We’ll just back up into reverse!
Rob Bearden: WE PLAN ON PLOWING WITH IT, WE’RE GOING TO RUN A PUMP WITH IT, DO SOME THRESHING WITH IT, AND MIGHT EVEN TAKE THE STEAM QUEEN FOR A RIDE IN IT.
**sound of tractor running**
THE JUMP TRACTOR MUSEUM, ANNIE’S PERMANENT HOME, WAS BUILT TO HOUSE THE VINTAGE TRACTOR COLLECTION OF J.R. SIMPLOT. HE BOUGHT ANNIE AND MANY OTHER TRACTORS FROM THE COLLECTION OF OSCAR COOK, AT “OSCAR’S DREAMLAND” IN BILLINGS, MONTANA.
DEFINITELY UNIQUE! THANKS ROSE.

THIS NEXT STORY IS ONE WE ALL LOVED.. A HERD OF GOATS THAT GETS TO EAT TO THEIR HEARTS’ CONTENT.. WHILE ELIMINATING STUBBORN WEEDS AND BRUSH!
AGWEEK REPORTER NOAH FISH INTERVIEWED GUS MAXFIELD AND HIS WIFE ANN, IN AUSTIN MINNESOTA. THEY GOT THE GOATS TO CLEAN UP THEIR LAND A FEW YEARS AGO, AND IT WORKED SO WELL THEY JOINED THE FRANCHISE GRAZING BUSINESS “GOATS ON THE GO”. THEY RENT THEIR GOATS OUT FOR CONTROLLING BRUSH AND NOXIOUS WEEDS.
THEY HAVE THREE HERDS, TOTALING 120 GOATS. A HERD OF 40 GOATS CAN CLEAN UP ONE ACRE IN ABOUT A WEEK.
Gus Maxfield: ABOUT ANYTHING THAT NOTHING ELSE WILL EAT. THEY EAT THISTLES, THEY EAT WILD PARSNIP, GARLIC MUSTARD, BUCKTHORN, ALL KINDS OF INVASIVE SPECIES. IT’S A GOOD NATURAL WAY TO DO THINGS WITHOUT USING CHEMICALS OR SPRAY OR STUFF LIKE THAT. THE GOATS ARE CAPABLE OF GETTING IN PLACES WHERE MECHANICAL MEANS ISN’T POSSIBLE, YOU KNOW IN ROUGH TERRAIN, STUFF LIKE THAT.
THE GOATS ARE CONTAINED BY TEMPORARY ELECTRIC FENCING. MAXFIELD SAYS THEIR AVERAGE JOB IS ONE ACRE, BUT THEY CAN DO UP TO FIVE OR SIX ACRES AT A TIME. HE SAYS THEY STAY BUSY FROM JUNE THROUGH SEPTEMBER.

UP NEXT, YOU DON’T HAVE TO TRAVEL OVERSEAS TO GET A TASTE OF AN AUTHENTIC EUROPEAN CREAMERY…

WELCOME BACK TO THIS SPECIAL HOLIDAY EDITION OF AGWEEK TV FROM SUPERIOR GRAIN EQUIPMENT IN KINDRED, NORTH DAKOTA.
ONE OF MY FAVORITE STORIES THIS YEAR IS A NORTH DAKOTA CREAMERY THAT’S BRINGING A TASTE OF EUROPE TO THE PRAIRIE. I VISITED COWS AND CO. CREAMERY IN CARRINGTON, AND GOT A TASTE OF THE NETHERLANDS.

Maartje: So we’re originally from the Netherlands.
MAARTJE MURPHY AND HER FAMILY MOVED TO CANADA FROM THE NETHERLANDS WHEN SHE WAS SEVEN YEARS OLD. HER PARENTS WERE DAIRY FARMERS WHO WANTED TO GROW THEIR OPERATION, BUT IT WAS HARD TO EXPAND THEIR FARM IN EUROPE.
Conny: We relocated because we saw that Europe was going to be difficult with all the regulations.
AFTER SPENDING EIGHT YEARS IN ALBERTA, CANADA, CONNY VAN BEDAF AND HER HUSBAND CORNE MOVED THEIR THREE CHILDREN ONE FINAL TIME TO CARRINGTON, NORTH DAKOTA. VAN BEDAF SAYS SHE ALWAYS HAD CHEESE MAKING IN THE BACK OF HER MIND, BUT NEVER PURSUED IT. HER DAUGHTER HAD ALSO WANTED TO MAKE GELATO AND BECOME A CHEESE MAKER. SO THE PAIR WENT TO GELATO UNIVERSITY IN ITALY.
Maartje: We went for a week and fell in love with the gelato making process, so we came back and thought how can we make this possible?
THEY TRANSFORMED THEIR GARAGE INTO A GELATO MAKING FACILITY. BUT MURPHY WANTED TO EXPAND. SHE AND HER HUSBAND CASEY BOUGHT A HOMESTEAD IN CARRINGTON A COUPLE OF YEARS AGO, AND NOW THEY MAKE THEIR PRODUCTS RIGHT ON THE FARM.
Casey: It’s a really fun, unique on farm experience where we like to bring the consumer in to share our slice of heaven with them.
COWS AND CO. USES THE MILK FROM THEIR DAIRY FARM FOR THEIR PRODUCTS, WHICH THEY THINK GIVES THEM AN EDGE. THEY HOUSE 15-HUNDRED DAIRY COWS AND SEND THE MILK THEY DON’T USE TO CASS-CLAY CREAMERY IN FARGO.
Conny: The quality of our milk was the number one priority at our farm
COWS AND CO. CREAMERY SELLS GELATO, GOUDA AND FRESH CHEDDAR CHEESE CURDS. MURPHY WANTED TO INCORPORATE A EUROPEAN EXPERIENCE INTO COWS AND CO, SO THEY BUILT AN ON-FARM CAFE, WHERE CUSTOMERS CAN SIT AND ENJOY THEIR PRODUCTS. ON-FARM CAFES ARE COMMON IN THE NETHERLANDS.
Maartje: Our main goal is for people to come to cows and co. and feel like they are in the Netherlands or in a country in Europe and sit on our patio and enjoy farm fresh products.
music up…
MURPHY EARNED A SPOT ON THE FORBES 30 UNDER 30 LIST FOR HER GELATO. AND SOON YOU WON’T HAVE TO TRAVEL TO CARRINGTON TO ENJOY THEIR PRODUCTS. THEY TELL ME THEY PLAN TO OPEN A STORE IN FARGO IN THE COMING YEAR.

STILL AHEAD, AN ANNUAL FAVORITE…AGWEEK OUTTAKES…

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK’S SPECIAL CHRISTMAS EDITION OF AG WEEK TV. IF YOU’D LIKE TO WATCH ANY OF THESE STORIES AGAIN, OR READ THE PRINT VERSION, GO TO AGWEEK.COM . WE’D LIKE TO AGAIN THANK SUPERIOR GRAIN EQUIPMENT FOR HOSTING US. AS WE SAY GOODBYE, WE HOPE YOU’LL ENJOY SOME AGWEEK TV OUTTAKES. MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!

**music begins**
Are we going to get them all or just some of…
Some pieces that can be hung on the walls as art? I said that weird.
I’m in the Southern Red…red…blah.
We’ll tell you about…Blah… I can’t talk anymore.
Find out why I’m holding this in Drayton, North Dakota.
Ha ha ha… I don’t know what I did there
On the Agweek Cereals Crop tour will touch…uhh..blah…
And it was used in a….pop pop pop..
I knew I’d screw it up.
Can I wave? Ha ha ha…
Through the roof. Some think neith…nah…pop pop pop…
Sorry. I’m kind of hesitating there.
Hooo…Haaa!…
I’m in northeast North Dakota where we’re. I’m eating my hair.
TV is hard.
*music ends**

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