Diaspora

5 things to know from Latin America & the Caribbean this week – Meriden Record-Journal

1. Latin America faces prolonged crisis after pandemic

A report released Thursday by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean said the region could face a “prolonged social crisis” in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The report found 13% of the region’s population is living in extreme poverty — 12 million more than in 2019 — before the COVID-19 pandemic.

The report said factors including high inflation and the fallout from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine will likely create a challenging landscape for governments seeking to push down the poverty rates. The report also notes that rising prices could lead to an increase in malnutrition and a slowdown in economic growth. 

The impacts are being felt more acutely among some marginalized groups, with the study stating that “poverty is considerably higher in Indigenous and Afro-descendent populations,” as well as children and women of certain age groups.

For information, visit: https://bit.ly/ajcovidlatam

2. UNICEF: DR expels 1,800 children to Haiti

Dominican authorities have expelled at least 1,800 unaccompanied Haitian migrant children this year, sending them back to their crisis-stricken country, UNICEF said.

The Dominican Republic denied the claim, which came Tuesday amid the government’s intensifying crackdown on migration in response to a cholera outbreak and ongoing gang violence in Haiti. Tensions between the neighboring countries deepened since the 2021 assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse, which thrust an already crisis-stricken Haiti into chaos.

The immigration crackdown has provoked harsh criticism by international observers, including the United States, which have accused the country of mass deportations, racist treatment of migrants and detentions of Haitians in facilities with poor conditions.

Dominican authorities say they deported 43,900 migrants, mostly Haitians, between July and October, according to figures from the country’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In September and October alone, deportation figures shot up by about 50%.

For more information, visit: https://bit.ly/apdrmigrants

3. Venezuelan government resumes talks with opposition

Venezuela’s government and the opposition agreed to create a U.N.-managed fund to finance health, food and education programs for the poor on Saturday. 

The agreement follows a long-stalled negotiation and was signed in Mexico City by representatives of President Maduro and the opposition, including the faction backed by the United States and led by Juan Guaidó.

Despite not recognizing the Venezuelan government under President Nicolás Maduro, the Biden administration eased some oil sanctions on the country and agreed to allow oil giant Chevron to pump Venezuelan oil in a bid to encourage the talks.

In addition, the agreement over the social fund is part of a broader agenda that is expected to advance in December, including the conditions for the presidential elections that are supposed to take place in 2024, the release of political prisoners and the withdrawal of decisions that bar many politicians from running for office.

For more information, visit: https://bit.ly/apvenezuelaoppositiontalk

4. President of El Salvador announces new anti-gang measures

President Nayib Bukele of El Salvador announced Wednesday that he will seal off sections of cities to search for street gang members, the latest phase in an increasingly tough nine-month anti-crime crackdown.

Bukele called it “Phase Five” of the crackdown, which has jailed more than 58,000 people since a state of emergency was declared following a wave of homicides in late March. The emergency decree has been renewed every month since then. It suspends some Constitutional rights and gives police more powers to arrest and hold suspects.

Under the decree, the right of association, the right to be informed of the reason for an arrest and access to a lawyer are suspended. The government also can intervene in the calls and mail of anyone they consider a suspect. The time someone can be held without charges is extended from three days to 15 days.

Nongovernmental organizations have tallied several thousand human rights violations and at least 80 in-custody deaths of people arrested during the crackdown.

For more information, visit: https://bit.ly/apsalvadorgangcrackdown

5. World Cup moves to knockout stage

Brazil and Portugal joined France on Monday as the only teams to have advanced automatically to the knockout rounds of the World Cup.

The third set of games began on Tuesday and included matches between the United States and Iran and Ecuador and Senegal — with the winners in both guaranteed a spot in the last 16.

After a 2-0 victory against Mexico, Argentina returned as a favorite to move forward in the tournament, pending a match with Poland set for Wednesday afternoon.

Uruguay and Costa Rica are unlikely to move on. Canada and host country Qatar have been eliminated.

For more information, visit: https://fifa.fans/3GUMXfA

lguzman@record-journal.com, Twitter: @lguzm_n 

Latino Communities Reporter Lau Guzmán is a corps member with Report for America, a national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms. Support RFA reporters at the Record-Journal through a donation at https://bit.ly/3Pdb0re, To learn more about RFA, visit www.reportforamerica.org.

A report released Thursday by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean said the region could face a “prolonged social crisis” in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.
The report found 13% of the region’s population is living in extreme poverty — 12 million more than in 2019 — before the COVID-19 pandemic.
The report said factors including high inflation and the fallout from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine will likely create a challenging landscape for governments seeking to push down the poverty rates. The report also notes that rising prices could lead to an increase in malnutrition and a slowdown in economic growth. 
The impacts are being felt more acutely among some marginalized groups, with the study stating that “poverty is considerably higher in Indigenous and Afro-descendent populations,” as well as children and women of certain age groups.
For information, visit: https://bit.ly/ajcovidlatam
Dominican authorities have expelled at least 1,800 unaccompanied Haitian migrant children this year, sending them back to their crisis-stricken country, UNICEF said.
The Dominican Republic denied the claim, which came Tuesday amid the government’s intensifying crackdown on migration in response to a cholera outbreak and ongoing gang violence in Haiti. Tensions between the neighboring countries deepened since the 2021 assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse, which thrust an already crisis-stricken Haiti into chaos.
The immigration crackdown has provoked harsh criticism by international observers, including the United States, which have accused the country of mass deportations, racist treatment of migrants and detentions of Haitians in facilities with poor conditions.
Dominican authorities say they deported 43,900 migrants, mostly Haitians, between July and October, according to figures from the country’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In September and October alone, deportation figures shot up by about 50%.
For more information, visit: https://bit.ly/apdrmigrants
Venezuela’s government and the opposition agreed to create a U.N.-managed fund to finance health, food and education programs for the poor on Saturday. 
The agreement follows a long-stalled negotiation and was signed in Mexico City by representatives of President Maduro and the opposition, including the faction backed by the United States and led by Juan Guaidó.
Despite not recognizing the Venezuelan government under President Nicolás Maduro, the Biden administration eased some oil sanctions on the country and agreed to allow oil giant Chevron to pump Venezuelan oil in a bid to encourage the talks.
In addition, the agreement over the social fund is part of a broader agenda that is expected to advance in December, including the conditions for the presidential elections that are supposed to take place in 2024, the release of political prisoners and the withdrawal of decisions that bar many politicians from running for office.
For more information, visit: https://bit.ly/apvenezuelaoppositiontalk
President Nayib Bukele of El Salvador announced Wednesday that he will seal off sections of cities to search for street gang members, the latest phase in an increasingly tough nine-month anti-crime crackdown.
Bukele called it “Phase Five” of the crackdown, which has jailed more than 58,000 people since a state of emergency was declared following a wave of homicides in late March. The emergency decree has been renewed every month since then. It suspends some Constitutional rights and gives police more powers to arrest and hold suspects.
Under the decree, the right of association, the right to be informed of the reason for an arrest and access to a lawyer are suspended. The government also can intervene in the calls and mail of anyone they consider a suspect. The time someone can be held without charges is extended from three days to 15 days.
Nongovernmental organizations have tallied several thousand human rights violations and at least 80 in-custody deaths of people arrested during the crackdown.
For more information, visit: https://bit.ly/apsalvadorgangcrackdown
Brazil and Portugal joined France on Monday as the only teams to have advanced automatically to the knockout rounds of the World Cup.
The third set of games began on Tuesday and included matches between the United States and Iran and Ecuador and Senegal — with the winners in both guaranteed a spot in the last 16.
After a 2-0 victory against Mexico, Argentina returned as a favorite to move forward in the tournament, pending a match with Poland set for Wednesday afternoon.
Uruguay and Costa Rica are unlikely to move on. Canada and host country Qatar have been eliminated.
For more information, visit: https://fifa.fans/3GUMXfA
lguzman@record-journal.com, Twitter: @lguzm_n 
Latino Communities Reporter Lau Guzmán is a corps member with Report for America, a national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms. Support RFA reporters at the Record-Journal through a donation at https://bit.ly/3Pdb0re, To learn more about RFA, visit www.reportforamerica.org.

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